Sign in

Former presidential speechwriter. Now helping CEOs and founders tell better stories. Co-founder of Presentality

這幾天看到網路上很多人稱讚蕭美琴在美國給的一場演講,是在 American Legislative Exchange Council 大會給的。Youtube 上還有完整的影片。

我就想要從一個英文撰稿人跟演講教練的角度,看一下她到底是哪裡講的好?

Ok, let’s go.

First, the speech video itself:

連開頭都跟傳統台灣官員不一樣

她一開頭,就用一種很 personal 的方式回應主辦單位的介紹:

Thank you Karen for that kind introduction…

畢竟用人家的 first name,就感覺比較親切對不對?通常外交場合,都是用 last name 的。

而且她跟台灣大部分官員用英文演講的時候有一個很不一樣的地方:

她講話的時候,是看著聽眾的 lol。

你可能會覺得 …


Simone Biles — some say the greatest gymnast in history — started quite the controversy by suddenly pulling out of the team finals and individual all-around competitions at the Tokyo Olympics.

The tidal waves of reaction came fast and hard. Some slammed her for being weak, being a quitter and an embarrassment. But just as quickly, others came to her defense.

Initially, I read some of the comments with nothing but spectator curiosity. But then I noticed something odd…

There was a big difference between the critics and the supporters in terms of how they “framed” the situation. …


上個月,我們分析了特斯拉老闆 Elon Musk 的溝通秘訣,下的結論是他完全打破賈伯斯時代企業領袖的模板。他就是一個尷尬的技術天才,所以:

  • 說起話來就是把遠大的東西,講成小小的很簡單 (Understatement)
  • 完全不練演講技能,怎麼說都很不流暢 (Awkward delivery)

很巧的是,最近有另一位時常出現在西方媒體的企業領袖,就完全是 Elon Musk 相反:

WeWork 共同創辦人暨前執行長 Adam Neumann。

他2019年因為諸多誇張的公司內幕及個人行為,成為全球科技媒體的抨擊對象,還被趕出自己的公司(雖然投資人為了要他滾蛋,給了他近兩億美金,真的)。

今年因為新書 The Cult of We 出版,再度登上了新聞版面。

雖然他變成大家的笑柄,但可別小看這個人: …


Elon Musk 可說是全世界影響力最高的商業領袖之一,而且在媒體及社群媒體的聲望奇高無比(IG 有200萬追隨者,Twitter 有6000萬),甚至一句話就可以影響市場的走向

他肯定是溝通大師對不對?而且舞台魅力一定很強大?

Well… 從溝通成效的角度來看,他是很厲害沒錯,但如果你看任何一場他的演講,你肯定會覺得很困惑。

你會覺得:這個人怎麼這麼尷尬,這麼不會講話?

隨便在 Youtube 上面搜尋他演講的影片,看個幾分鐘,你就會知道我們在說什麼了。

看個幾分鐘就可以跳出至少以下的問題:

  • 說話吱吱唔唔,贅字一堆
  • 停頓在很尷尬的地方,感覺不知道自己在哪裡
  • 投影片視覺,跟口述的內容常常對不起來
  • 容易忘記自己要說什麼,明顯要去偷瞄一下投影片,不然無法繼續說
  • 等等…

啊… 那他到底厲害在哪裡?為什麼一個講話這麼尷尬不流暢的人,能夠迷惑全球這麼多人, …


不知為何,幾天前我的 Youtube 突然推薦了前新加坡總理李光耀 (Lee Kuan Yew) 接受西方媒體採訪的影片。

我知道很多名人說李光耀是他們最敬佩的領導人之一,但我從來沒看過他說話的影片, 我就決定來看看他是否真的很會溝通。

結果,我的天啊,太強大了。

就算影片是幾十年前的,影像跟聲音的畫質都不是很好,你還是可以感受到他講話的力道、威嚴、還有魅力。

我們就來解析他的一些溝通及說話技巧吧。

*Btw 影片在這裡,你不妨自己體驗一段:

如果這是你第一次聽他說話,你第一個注意到的,很可能是他的英文有多流利。畢竟人家可是在英國劍橋大學受教育的,英文根本就是母語。

但除了口音之外,最能展現語文能力的,是他的用字遣詞。

選擇有效的字眼,及潛在意義

當第一位記者問他,他對美國在越戰使用武力的看法時(有點敏感啊!),他的回答,每個字都選擇的 …


我的工作需要看非常多的英文。

其中有英文母語的人寫的,也有非母語的人寫的。最近,我注意到一個兩者之間很明顯的差別,很少有人提到,因為它無關文法正確,也不是用字遣詞多有學問,多文雅。

差別,在句子的長短

Well,更正確的來說,是長句跟短句的交錯。

我發現,非母語人寫的英文句子,不但比英文母語的人寫的長,而且是大部分句子都很長。母語的人,尤其是很會寫的人,則是會把長句跟短句混合搭配。

Ok… So What?

你可能會說 ok,母語的人比較會用短的句子,那又怎樣?句子的長短,跟我寫作的好壞,有關嗎?

關係可大了。

就像音樂或是影片,文字也是「內容」。只要是「內容」,就有它的節奏。你可以想像一首曲子,從頭到尾都是很長的音,而且一點變化都沒有嗎?或是一部很長的影片,從頭到尾都是很長的畫面,而且一點節奏的變化都沒有嗎?

你應該可以想像:這些就是要幫助我們入睡的內容。

所以,如果你想要維持讀者的注意力,我建議適度變換你文字的節奏。

但我們先看案例。

我拿一篇台灣人寫的文,跟另一篇美國人寫的,來做比較:把每個句子都分拆成不同的段落,句子的長短就一目了然了。

台灣案例:Taipei Times Opinion

我們納入開頭的十句來看看:

  1. The TAIEX last month rose above 17,000 points as rallies in steel, shipping and some non-tech stocks offset a weakness in semiconductor and electronics stocks.
  2. While news about a cluster of local COVID-19 infections connected with China Airlines cargo pilots and a hotel in Taoyuan fueled selling pressure early this month and pushed the local stock market into consolidation mode, the daily market turnover in the first two trading sessions of this month hit fresh highs.
  3. Moreover, Taiwan’s stock trading volume last month began to surpass…


Dear Mr. Yang,
Your PacNet piece is the best thing I’ve read. Would you be interested in coming to New York to brief us on the topic?

這是我在華府戰略暨國際研究中心 (CSIS) 任職的時候,收到的一封 email。寄件人我早已經久仰大名,曾任美國駐中國大使。他跟另一位前大使正要前往中國,希望出發前邀請我到紐約跟他們簡報。

但我收到那封信,非常困惑。因為那時的我,才22歲。

我剛大學畢業不久,在智庫也還只是個實習生。兩位德高望重的大使,為何會想要把我飛到紐約去跟他們簡報?


Like a lot of my friends in tech circles, I watched with curiosity, then shock, as more than a third of Basecamp employees quit the company after Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson announced policy changes.

I glanced at Fried’s initial post when he published it and, to be fully honest, I thought it was well-written and reasoned. He’s a great writer and communicator, and I thought they’d averted a crisis.

My goodness was I wrong.

So I decided to go back and re-read Fried’s initial blog post —but this time with my speechwriter lens back on.

I was completely…


After I wrote about my traumatic relationship with public speaking — fails leading to shame, shame leading to worse fails— a friend of mine asked me a question:

When was the exact moment I started feeling shame?

As a little kid, I don’t actually recall having any concrete notions of shame, and that’s how I could fall off the stage and get up right away to finish the speech. I didn’t know better.

But when DID shame get control over me?

After some searching, I managed to trace it back to one specific moment: an improv performance workshop in junior…


Found this in 2021, and it's as relevant as ever!

For me a top takeaway is "intellectual honesty". Most founders I meet don't express their POV as hypotheses to be validated, and this can hurt them (especially when they don't admit that these are just hypotheses).

Andrew Yang

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store